Neo-Assyrian openwork plaque with ram-headed sphinx, dating back to the 9th–8th century BCE. The ivory object was found in the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY. 
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Neo-Assyrian openwork plaque with ram-headed sphinx, dating back to the 9th–8th century BCE. The ivory object was found in the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY. 

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch (the word for eagle in Arabic is Nisr) on the walls of the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). The god Nisroch is associated with the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who conquered and destroyed Babylon. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch (the word for eagle in Arabic is Nisr) on the walls of the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). The god Nisroch is associated with the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who conquered and destroyed Babylon. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Golden Achaemenid ornament depicting a lion’s head and dating back to the 5th-6th century BCE. The city of Babylon served as the main imperial capital for the Achaemenid Persians until 331 BCE. Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ. 
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Golden Achaemenid ornament depicting a lion’s head and dating back to the 5th-6th century BCE. The city of Babylon served as the main imperial capital for the Achaemenid Persians until 331 BCE. Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton, NJ. 

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Assyrian horse blinker with the Eye of Horus from the 8th century BCE. The ivory Egyptian-type wedjat-eye was found in the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Assyrian horse blinker with the Eye of Horus from the 8th century BCE. The ivory Egyptian-type wedjat-eye was found in the ancient Assyrian city of Nimrud. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Iraq wants international support to excavate Mesopotamian Marshes

March 26, 2014

Liwa’ Smaysim, the Iraqi Minister of Tourism and Antiquities, stated that Iraq has plans to organize a major conference later this year for all local and foreign excavation teams in order to explore latest technologies in archaeological excavations. He also indicated that the ministry hopes that this gathering will be the first step towards organizing an international conference to address the status of Mesopotamian antiquities.  

Qais Hussein Rashid, the Director of the Museums Board at the Iraqi Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities, stated that the main reason behind excavating the Mesopotamian Marshes sites is the fact that they need to be explored and documented before they submerge in the marshes’ rising waters. He pointed out that the ministry has developed a road-map to save more than 122 archeological sites before they disappear under the marshes’ waters. However, the work has been slow due to the limited number of excavation teams and the need for more international support.  

Rashid also noted that the National Museum received 1950 important artifacts from excavation teams working in that area, some of which date back to the Babylonian, Parthian, Sassanid and Islamic periods.  

The South News Agency

Detail from a low-relief sculpture depicting a Winged Genius with pail and date palm spathe from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Worcester Art Museum. Worcester, MA.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail from a low-relief sculpture depicting a Winged Genius with pail and date palm spathe from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Worcester Art Museum. Worcester, MA.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Wishing all the Tumblr Babylonians from all countries and in every corner of the world a HAPPY BABYLONIAN NEW YEAR! Let’s keep celebrating the great history, art and literature of Babylonia.

Wishing all the Tumblr Babylonians from all countries and in every corner of the world a HAPPY BABYLONIAN NEW YEAR! Let’s keep celebrating the great history, art and literature of Babylonia.

The majestic human-headed Lamassu from the Assyrian capital of Khorsabad (Dur-Sharrukin). The sculpture was among the artifacts that were obtained by the University of Chicago during its Oriental Institute’s excavations of Khorsabad from 1928-1935. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

The majestic human-headed Lamassu from the Assyrian capital of Khorsabad (Dur-Sharrukin). The sculpture was among the artifacts that were obtained by the University of Chicago during its Oriental Institute’s excavations of Khorsabad from 1928-1935. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail of a striding lion made from polychrome glazed bricks, one of dozens that decorated the walls of the Processional Street and the royal palaces of Babylon. The lion relief dates back to the era of king Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon (605-562 BCE). Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, CT.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail of a striding lion made from polychrome glazed bricks, one of dozens that decorated the walls of the Processional Street and the royal palaces of Babylon. The lion relief dates back to the era of king Nebuchadnezzar II of Babylon (605-562 BCE). Yale University Art Gallery, New Haven, CT.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

The Assyrian Lamassu from the city of Nimrud, dating back to the reign of king Ashurnasirpal II from 883 to 859 BC. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.   
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

The Assyrian Lamassu from the city of Nimrud, dating back to the reign of king Ashurnasirpal II from 883 to 859 BC. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.   

Photo by Babylon Chronicle