Detail of a bas-relief from the Temple of Nabu, the Babylonian god of wisdom and writing, in Khorsabad (Dur-Sharrukin), the capital city of the Assyrian Empire. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.   
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail of a bas-relief from the Temple of Nabu, the Babylonian god of wisdom and writing, in Khorsabad (Dur-Sharrukin), the capital city of the Assyrian Empire. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.   

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

The human-headed bull from the city of Persepolis (Takht E-Jamshid) in the Achaemenid Empire. This mythical creature is common in Near East cultures, especially in Assyria and Achaemenid Persia. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

The human-headed bull from the city of Persepolis (Takht E-Jamshid) in the Achaemenid Empire. This mythical creature is common in Near East cultures, especially in Assyria and Achaemenid Persia. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Copper statue of the Sun God Shamash, dating back to 1700-1600 BCE. Shamash, the Babylonian god of justice, is depicted on the famous Code of Hammurabi. The sun is named after him in Arabic, Hebrew and Syriac. Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY. 
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Copper statue of the Sun God Shamash, dating back to 1700-1600 BCE. Shamash, the Babylonian god of justice, is depicted on the famous Code of Hammurabi. The sun is named after him in Arabic, Hebrew and Syriac. Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Sliver Tetradrachm with head of Alexander the Great, dating back to 297-281 BCE. This coin conveys Alexander’s superhuman status by endowing him with the ram’s horn of the god Zues-Ammon. The Macedonian king ruled Babylon from 331 BCE until his death in that same city in 323 BCE. Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Sliver Tetradrachm with head of Alexander the Great, dating back to 297-281 BCE. This coin conveys Alexander’s superhuman status by endowing him with the ram’s horn of the god Zues-Ammon. The Macedonian king ruled Babylon from 331 BCE until his death in that same city in 323 BCE. Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, MA.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Head of Gudea, ruler of the Sumerian city of Lagash in Southern Mesopotamia. The diorite stone sculpture dates back to around 2090 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY. 
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Head of Gudea, ruler of the Sumerian city of Lagash in Southern Mesopotamia. The diorite stone sculpture dates back to around 2090 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY. 

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Winged lion-griffin from a collection of golden Achaemenid ornaments. Lion-themed symbols and mythical creatures were common in the Achaemenid Persian Empire, whose main imperial capital was Babylon: a city that used the lion as a royal symbol. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Winged lion-griffin from a collection of golden Achaemenid ornaments. Lion-themed symbols and mythical creatures were common in the Achaemenid Persian Empire, whose main imperial capital was Babylon: a city that used the lion as a royal symbol. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Statue of a bearded man, probably a priest, made of limestone from Achaemenid Cyprus. The statue, dating back to 550-500 BCE, depicts a fusion of Greek and Mesopotamian elements reflecting Cyprus’ multicultural history. The island became part of the Assyrian Empire at the end of the 8th century BCE, and later joined the Persian Achaemenid Empire in the 6th century BCE. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Statue of a bearded man, probably a priest, made of limestone from Achaemenid Cyprus. The statue, dating back to 550-500 BCE, depicts a fusion of Greek and Mesopotamian elements reflecting Cyprus’ multicultural history. The island became part of the Assyrian Empire at the end of the 8th century BCE, and later joined the Persian Achaemenid Empire in the 6th century BCE. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, ME.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Iraq recovers 15,000 stolen artifacts since 2003

May 21, 2014 

The Iraqi Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities announced on Sunday that Iraq has been able to recover 15,000 stolen artifacts since 2003. More than 4,000 artifacts that went missing during the looting of the Iraqi National Museum in April of 2003 are among the recovered Mesopotamian treasures.     

Qasim Tahir Al-Sudani, the ministry’s public relations director, indicated in a press release that the ministry has managed to recover different artifacts and coins that were unearthed by random looting of archeological sites since 2003. Additionally, 4,328 artifacts bearing museum accession numbers were also recovered.    

Al-Sudani added that the ministry is greatly invested in recovering the stolen and smuggled artifacts of Mesopotamia and it has been collaborating with the Iraqi Ministries of Culture and Foreign Affairs and different embassies to accomplish this goal.

Ayn al-Iraq News Agency

Detail of a relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail of a relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail of a Sasanian silver bowl depicting a hunting scene. The partially gilded bowl dates back to the 4th-5th century CE. The capital of the Sassanid Persian Empire, Seleucia-Ctesiphon, (near modern-day Baghdad and ancient Babylon) was the largest city in the world until its destruction in the 7th century CE. Freer and Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. 
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail of a Sasanian silver bowl depicting a hunting scene. The partially gilded bowl dates back to the 4th-5th century CE. The capital of the Sassanid Persian Empire, Seleucia-Ctesiphon, (near modern-day Baghdad and ancient Babylon) was the largest city in the world until its destruction in the 7th century CE. Freer and Sackler Galleries of the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC. 

Photo by Babylon Chronicle