Sasanian-influenced mold-blown glass bottle, dating back to 1000-1200 CE. Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.   
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Sasanian-influenced mold-blown glass bottle, dating back to 1000-1200 CE. Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.   

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Diorite statue of Gudea, ruler of the Sumerian city of Lagash in Southern Iraq, dating back to around 2090 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.        
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Diorite statue of Gudea, ruler of the Sumerian city of Lagash in Southern Iraq, dating back to around 2090 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.        

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Relief on alabaster panel from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II at the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Relief on alabaster panel from the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II at the Assyrian Imperial capital of Nimrud (883-859 BCE). Hood Museum of Art at Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Assyrian ivory plaque from the ancient city of Nimrud, with a warrior slaying a griffin, dating back to the 9th–8th century BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Assyrian ivory plaque from the ancient city of Nimrud, with a warrior slaying a griffin, dating back to the 9th–8th century BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Sasanian-influenced flask, dating back to the 11th century CE. Sasanian glass of Persia and Mesopotamia was the key model for glass manufacture in later periods, especially during the Abbasid era. Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Sasanian-influenced flask, dating back to the 11th century CE. Sasanian glass of Persia and Mesopotamia was the key model for glass manufacture in later periods, especially during the Abbasid era. Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Terracotta female figure with ancient Mesopotamian patterns, dating back to the late 3rd millennium BCE. Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Terracotta female figure with ancient Mesopotamian patterns, dating back to the late 3rd millennium BCE. Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Mesopotamian pottery with Aramaic script, the dominant language in Iraq prior to the 7th Century CE. The alphabetical script replaced Cuneiform as the major writing method in Mesopotamia during the Hellenistic Era. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.     
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Mesopotamian pottery with Aramaic script, the dominant language in Iraq prior to the 7th Century CE. The alphabetical script replaced Cuneiform as the major writing method in Mesopotamia during the Hellenistic Era. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.     

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail of a bas-relief from the Temple of Nabu, the Babylonian god of wisdom and writing, in Khorsabad (Dur-Sharrukin), the capital city of the Assyrian Empire. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.   
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Detail of a bas-relief from the Temple of Nabu, the Babylonian god of wisdom and writing, in Khorsabad (Dur-Sharrukin), the capital city of the Assyrian Empire. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.   

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

The human-headed bull from the city of Persepolis (Takht E-Jamshid) in the Achaemenid Empire. This mythical creature is common in Near East cultures, especially in Assyria and Achaemenid Persia. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.  
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

The human-headed bull from the city of Persepolis (Takht E-Jamshid) in the Achaemenid Empire. This mythical creature is common in Near East cultures, especially in Assyria and Achaemenid Persia. The Oriental Institute Museum at the University of Chicago, Chicago, IL.  

Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Copper statue of the Sun God Shamash, dating back to 1700-1600 BCE. Shamash, the Babylonian god of justice, is depicted on the famous Code of Hammurabi. The sun is named after him in Arabic, Hebrew and Syriac. Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY. 
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

Copper statue of the Sun God Shamash, dating back to 1700-1600 BCE. Shamash, the Babylonian god of justice, is depicted on the famous Code of Hammurabi. The sun is named after him in Arabic, Hebrew and Syriac. Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle